What an interesting story Mary Palcich Keyes weaves for us in “The Forgotten Cruiser” (Herald Review, October 13). These men (some women, too) who went into the woods for weeks on end to inventory the forest for what was there: The types of trees and estimated the quantity, all so that loggers who came eventually would know what to expect. As someone who grew up in “the Cities” as we like to call them, I had little first-hand knowledge of forests and logging. It took brains, and, and, yes brawn, to do this kind of work. The brain was the “computer” they used to inventory the forest; the brawn to withstand the rigors of that kind of lifestyle. Necessary and physically demanding work.

A sort of romance surrounds these cruisers. Much like cowboys, they had an independent strain in them. A rowdy side sometimes, too, that added a sort of patina to their character. Much has changed over the years. The same kind of work is being done now but with the help of modern technology. As I occasionally travel around the back roads of the area I often stop and talk to loggers, many of whom are very comfortable sharing the story about the work they do.

Logging has placed an indelible stamp on the personality of our part of the world and our life is all the richer for it. May this spirit continue to be part of who we are for decades to come. Thank you Mary Palcich Keyes for sharing this interesting history with us.

Don Osell Cohasset

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